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hedgeworth:

perksofbeingfab:

lsdemon:

more embroidered bread

why the fuck would you embroider

∞FOLLOW FOR MORE SOFT BREAD EMBROIDERY∞

hedgeworth:

perksofbeingfab:

lsdemon:

more embroidered bread

why the fuck would you embroider

FOLLOW FOR MORE SOFT BREAD EMBROIDERY∞

coelasquid:

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:


biyuti:


girljanitor:


dumbthingswhitepplsay:


popca:


dolgematki:


nativevoice:


“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 
IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.
A case of ginger ale: $82.
Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.
Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120608/inuit-food-prices-protest-120608/#ixzz1xKWAJkGe


Holy hell.


WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.


ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross
64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.
Conservationists
have been starving
these people
to death for years.


Reblogging for the extra articles. 
Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 


Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.


This is really fucking important.
This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.
It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.
The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.
Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.
There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

Things that (usually white) folks who consider themselves fair and educated and liberal in big southern cities say about hunting under the impression that they understand the situation in the North that never fail to make me bristle;
"I’m against seal hunting but it’s okay if they’re Inuit" Inuit are not the only Native group in Canada that traditionally hunts seals and to suggest only people registered with the government as Inuit should be able to hunt them is terribly racist and exclusionary to other nations that overlap many of the same territories, such as Dene (who have had a history of being excluded from legislation written to benefit Inuit, this was a big discussion that happened when Nunavut was formed) and some Cree bands, among others. That aside, even just suggesting that only native people with government treaty status should be allowed to hunt raises issues dating back to several decades ago when Canada had terribly racist and sexist laws on the books that stripped native women who married white men of their treaty status and banned their children from having their status recognized, as well as force natives who wanted to vote in federal elections to renounce their status. These laws were not amended until 1985 and people were allowed to reapply for treaty status, but the paperwork is a nightmare and many people didn’t bother. As a result, the North is full of people without treaty status who have just as much native heritage and were raised with as much of the culture as people who do, but nothing can really be done about it. As one of my friends put it “I’ve got the skin colour I just don’t have the number to go with it.” It’s a very complicated issue.
"Inuit who make seal clothing for themselves are okay, the problem is non-natives who buy seal products" Inuit and other native people are modern human beings with modern human interests and hobbies, they often sell goods to people outside of their communities to earn money for purchasing things they would like to own. The romantic idea people in cities get of Northerners living off the land to fulfill their every need is, frankly, false and patronizing as all get out. Yes, it’s true their priority is feeding and clothing their families, but in some communities selling goods to companies who deal in distributing authentic northern crafts is one of the only forms of infrastructure available, and dissuading the purchase of those goods by non-natives is harmful to their business. Just this whole “seal = bad” idea conservationists have pushed so hard has done irreparable damage to people’s livelihoods without really doing all that much good for the environment. At the very least, selling furs can allow hunters to break even on their hunting trips and raise the funds to continue hunting for food without losing money. It’s important to know where your skins are coming from and in many cases you can ask the retailer, but suggesting natives should not be able to sell merchandise outside of their communities is not the answer.
"If it’s so bad why don’t they just move somewhere with more jobs and cheaper produce" There are so many things wrong with this line of reasoning you could write a university thesis on how ignorant it is and if someone honestly asks this you basically know you can stop talking to them.

coelasquid:

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:

biyuti:

girljanitor:

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

popca:

dolgematki:

nativevoice:

“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 

IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.

A case of ginger ale: $82.

Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.

Holy hell.

WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.

ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross

64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.

Conservationists

have been starving

these people

to death for years.

Reblogging for the extra articles. 

Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 

Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.

This is really fucking important.

This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.

It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.

The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.

  • Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
  • If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
  • Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
  • Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
  • For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
  • Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
  • For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
  • Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.

There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

Things that (usually white) folks who consider themselves fair and educated and liberal in big southern cities say about hunting under the impression that they understand the situation in the North that never fail to make me bristle;

  • "I’m against seal hunting but it’s okay if they’re Inuit" Inuit are not the only Native group in Canada that traditionally hunts seals and to suggest only people registered with the government as Inuit should be able to hunt them is terribly racist and exclusionary to other nations that overlap many of the same territories, such as Dene (who have had a history of being excluded from legislation written to benefit Inuit, this was a big discussion that happened when Nunavut was formed) and some Cree bands, among others. That aside, even just suggesting that only native people with government treaty status should be allowed to hunt raises issues dating back to several decades ago when Canada had terribly racist and sexist laws on the books that stripped native women who married white men of their treaty status and banned their children from having their status recognized, as well as force natives who wanted to vote in federal elections to renounce their status. These laws were not amended until 1985 and people were allowed to reapply for treaty status, but the paperwork is a nightmare and many people didn’t bother. As a result, the North is full of people without treaty status who have just as much native heritage and were raised with as much of the culture as people who do, but nothing can really be done about it. As one of my friends put it “I’ve got the skin colour I just don’t have the number to go with it.” It’s a very complicated issue.
  • "Inuit who make seal clothing for themselves are okay, the problem is non-natives who buy seal products" Inuit and other native people are modern human beings with modern human interests and hobbies, they often sell goods to people outside of their communities to earn money for purchasing things they would like to own. The romantic idea people in cities get of Northerners living off the land to fulfill their every need is, frankly, false and patronizing as all get out. Yes, it’s true their priority is feeding and clothing their families, but in some communities selling goods to companies who deal in distributing authentic northern crafts is one of the only forms of infrastructure available, and dissuading the purchase of those goods by non-natives is harmful to their business. Just this whole “seal = bad” idea conservationists have pushed so hard has done irreparable damage to people’s livelihoods without really doing all that much good for the environment. At the very least, selling furs can allow hunters to break even on their hunting trips and raise the funds to continue hunting for food without losing money. It’s important to know where your skins are coming from and in many cases you can ask the retailer, but suggesting natives should not be able to sell merchandise outside of their communities is not the answer.
  • "If it’s so bad why don’t they just move somewhere with more jobs and cheaper produce" There are so many things wrong with this line of reasoning you could write a university thesis on how ignorant it is and if someone honestly asks this you basically know you can stop talking to them.
InfoSec Taylor Swift is likely humanities crowning achievement.
Don’t forget the Twitter either.

InfoSec Taylor Swift is likely humanities crowning achievement.

Don’t forget the Twitter either.

derwents:

ssleepover:

the music gets me every fucking time omg

naaaaaaa nananananana





sekigan:

War Lord Titan | Nerding - Fantasy/Models/Images/Etc | Pinterest

ringingallover:

meecheee123:

ringingallover:

do centaur babies suckle from the horse nipples or the human nipples tho

Centaurs aren’t real. Do you understand that?

yes that is why i made a tumblr post about this instead of just asking a real centaur

brightchimeradragon:

just-bx:

Just SCience

IT TOOK ME TWO TIMES TO UNDERSTAND WHAT WAS GOING ON, HOLY FUCKING SHIT MY SIDES.

brightchimeradragon:

just-bx:

Just SCience

IT TOOK ME TWO TIMES TO UNDERSTAND WHAT WAS GOING ON, HOLY FUCKING SHIT MY SIDES.

kedreeva:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.

A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!

Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.

All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.

Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

Let me tell to you a thing.

This is Lenore. I first saw her in a little cage at the Petco I frequent (I used to take my parents’ dog in for puppy play time), and she looked like the grouchiest, old, crotchety cat in the world, and I fell instantly in love. She was cranky, she was anti-social, hanging out at the back of her cage. Her fur was matted because she wouldn’t let the groomers near her.

She was perfect.

But I didn’t have a place for her. I wasn’t living in my own space yet, and where I was, I wasn’t allowed cats. So I pressed my face to the bars of her cage and I promised that if no one had adopted her by the time I’d bought a house, I would come back for her.

I visited her every week for over six months while I looked for a house. At one point, they had to just shave her entire rear-end because the mats of fur were so bad. They told me she clawed the heck outta the groomer that did it, screamed the entire time, and spent the next two days growling at anyone that came near the cage.

A couple of weeks later, I closed on my house. I went back and I got an employee, and I said: “That one. I need that cat.”

They got the paperwork and the lady who ran the rescue that was bringing the cats in told me that Lenore (at the time, Lila) was 8 years old, had been owned by an elderly lady who had died, and brought in to a different rescue, who’d had her for six months on top of the time I’d been seeing her at Petco.

This kitty had been living in a 3x3’ cube for over a YEAR because she was older and “less adoptable.”

I signed the paperwork, put her in a cat carrier, and drove her to my new home. I had pretty much nothing; a bed, an old couch, a couple of bookcases, and a tank of mice I called “Cat TV”. I let her out of the carrier and onto my bed, and I told her “I told you I would come back for you when I had a place. It’s not much, but it’s yours too now.”

Lenore spent the next three days straight purring non-stop. She followed me around the house purring. Sat next to me purring. Slept next to me purring. Leaning into every touch, purring, purring, always purring. She still purrs if you so much as think about petting her. She’s amazing, and I love her.

So, you know, if you’re thinking about adopting, and you see a beast that others consider “less adoptable,” think about Lenore.

WHAT THESE SOLDIERS ARE REALLY THINKING

whatwouldkingleonidasdo:

image

This picture has been popping up in my Facebook feed with various anti-Islamic comments so it might be time for a little fact-check.

The picture purports to be ‘Aussie Diggers’ and the story is usually “These Aussie Diggers died for your country, something something, so Muslims don’t belong here” or words to that effect.

Firstly, that semi-famous picture depicts British Soldiers in Burma in World War 2, not Aussies. Yes, the British in Burma wore hats like that too. Burma is where Lieutenant Colonel Tom Price of the Victorian Mounted Rifles got the idea for the first Slouch Hats back in the late 1800s. Many of the 90,000 or so (mostly Islamic) African soldiers that fought there against the Japanese also wore them.

Secondly, when the Allies evacuated Burma in the face of the Japanese invasion they armed the Islamic Burmese to continue the fighting. The mostly Buddhist Burmese Nationals sided with the Japanese when they looked like they were winning, and only switched back at the end of the campaign when it became clear the Allies were winning. But while the Allies continued the fight from India, thousands of Islamic Burmese were killed while they resisted, tying up forces away from the front.

Meanwhile, despite the influx of dominion troops to the theater, the majority of the Allied forces continuing the fight against Japan from India were Indian Army. About 40% of the Indian Army at that time was Islamic; even though Muslims made up only about 25% of the population, (India included Pakistan at the time). This is partly because at the outbreak of the war the minority Indian Muslim League immediately sided with the British while the non-Islamic Indian National Congress refused to fight without full independence. Elements of the National Congress even formed two divisions of rebel troops that fought for Japan against the Allies. Overall during the war the Indian Army, with the unwavering support of the Muslim League, committed 2.5 million soldiers to the allied effort, most of which fought in other theaters despite their homeland being under threat. To this day, it remains the largest all-volunteer army ever assembled.

Only about 40 Australian soldiers served in Burma, though several thousand Australian sailors and airmen served there. Around 2700 Australian soldiers did die in Burma. They were prisoners of the Japanese shipped there to provide slave labour and they were tortured, beaten, worked and starved to death. And I’m willing to bet that if they rocked up today they would be less concerned about the 2.5% of the Australian population that share the same religion as their coloured allies, than they would be about the 80% of the Australian population that spend billions of dollars per year on Japanese and German cars, motorbikes and/or electronic goods.

So unless you’re willing to set fire to your Toyota Hilux, with its Bridgestone Desert Duellers and its Pioneer sub-woofers, and swear a blood oath against the Emperor of the Sun and all his descendents, then maybe you should stop hijacking another generation’s sacrifice for your own xenophobic ends. Like it or not, one Australian generation’s enemies usually end up being the next generation’s best mates. It has been that way with the South Africans, the Turks, Germans, Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, and it will always be that way, regardless of what gets your particular hate-boner turgid.

Well, maybe not all South Africans…